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Jen Ede

Letter From the Publisher – Winter 2016

By Jen Ede

The year is slowly drawing to a close, and now, it’s time to rest. We, along with our Wisconsin growers, producers and artisans, have reaped the harvests of what we’ve sown, and the darkness and cold have forced us to slow down. We’re looking forward to taking stock of the months behind us and celebrating what we’ve achieved together to further the impact of buying local on our community. Please notice that in this issue, we’re talking about much more than just what fills our bellies—but about extending the local sourcing to the items we use to cook, that we surround ourselves with, to enhance our daily lives.

I love living my life according to the rhythm of the seasons—as much as is possible to do amid crazy scheduling, jobs, friends and family obligations. The holidays make the mad rush that much more intense, but in them comes opportunities to eat and do things that I’ve been looking forward to all year long. I braise, stew and roast like crazy, leaving the baking to the ones who have the patience (and measuring skills). In this issue, we offer recipes for both kinds of cook—odes Read More

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JenEdeFall2016

Letter From the Publisher – Fall 2016

By Jen Ede

I’m a fall baby. It’s not that I don’t devour the hell out a tomato sandwich, or grilled corn that’s been dipped into a paint can full of butter at the State Fair. I look forward to these foods, voraciously, every year. You know that saying, “doing something like it’s going out of style?” Well, in summer, I eat like certain foods are going out of season … because they are. Each week, I played Iron Chef with my CSA from Pinehold Gardens, sneaking vegetables into breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. I couldn’t keep up with the abundance, but I loved trying.

The changing rhythm of the seasons is comforting to me, and Wisconsin is the perfect place to celebrate fall with food, drink and activities. The wind will soon get colder and the days even shorter. We’ll need denser food and thicker drinks to ready ourselves for the winter (or, at least, that’s what we’ll tell ourselves). Braising, basting and baking replace grilling and chilling. Porters and stouts replace pilsners. When planning your menus, or going out to explore the world around you, let local be your guide. Try something new this season!

When planning

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Letter From the Publisher – Summer 2016

By Jen Ede

Winter went out like a lion; spring ambled in timidly, like a lamb. And now that the dog days of summer are upon us, we’re as hungry as bears. Idioms aside, we did spend a lot of time hibernating and now we’re ravenous— both literally and metaphorically.

The issue you hold in your hands launches Edible Milwaukee into its fourth year. For us, the need to document and shape Wisconsin’s local food culture is just as strong as it was when we published our first issue in May of 2013. Our mission remains unchanged: EAT, DRINK, READ, THINK. So here’s some food for thought:

A few years ago, “artisan, “local,” “organic” and “sustainable” were niche terms; now they have entered the mainstream. Because they’ve been widely adopted, it’s becoming harder and harder to know where they’re being used as a buzzword or marketing opportunity and where they’re real.

Since 2013, Edible Milwaukee has been the city’s most vocal forum and champion for a vibrant, emerging local food culture.

Food is, and always has been, a business opportunity—and a lucrative one. We all eat. We all want variety. We all want healthy food. Our readers tell us they … Read More

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Letter From the Publisher – Spring 2016

By Jen Ede

With the help of big barrel-aged beers, Netflix binges of Mind of a Chef and various festivals, we’ve managed to survive another Wisconsin winter. We’ve cooked and stayed in a lot, and after this hibernation, it’s now time to peel off layers and get some fresh air. For some of us, that might mean finding a patio in the sun. For others, it might mean going out to catch, forage or harvest your next meal.

During the cold weather, our thoughts inevitably drift toward escaping someplace warm. Most of us can’t afford that trip to Bali, but what we can afford is to be tourists in our own city. We’ve done the hard work for you, highlighting ten locally-sourcing restaurants for all your daily lunching needs. If you’re looking for a way to quench your thirst at night, read our round of craft beer bar recommendations and start checking some destinations off your list. For those especially suffering from wanderlust, go South by Midwest with a visit to New Orleans by way of Milwaukee restaurant, Maxie’s.

Opportunities to eat local are springing up all around us, bringing along with the season a sense of rebirth and … Read More

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JenEdeWinter2015

Letter From the Publisher – Winter 2015

By Jen Ede

In both my business life and professional life, I talk a lot about the idea of a “tribe”—plainly, your tribe consists of the people who are there for you, whenever, for whatever it is that you need. They are your partners in pursuit of building something better, those who help you up when you fall—who encourage you along in your path and cheer the loudest when you achieve your goal.

Since the beginning, our community partners, readers and friends have been this tribe for us. We have reached a great many milestones by our third year, and this holiday season, we once again give thanks to them. Please, show our partners your support in turn by patronizing their businesses and thanking them for powering our magazine with their advertising dollars.

By collaboration or design, Milwaukee’s food community is its own tribe and there is some serious mutual support at work. This quarter, new businesses opened—the Innovation and Wellness Commons, a project by Fix Development, led by Walnut Way, gave home to another Outpost retail store, the Fondy Food Center’s offices, The Juice Kitchen and others in the Lindsay Heights neighborhood. This project’s fruition brought with it … Read More

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JenEdeFall2015

Letter From the Publisher – Fall 2015

By Jen Ede

Whenever someone asks me how an upcoming issue of Edible Milwaukee is coming along, I often end up explaining the process as if publishing a magazine were the same as cooking or baking. “Oh, it’s still marinating.”

“No, it’s not ready yet, we’re just waiting on this last ingredient.”

“It’s going to be DELICIOUS. Almost done.”

“You’re definitely going to want seconds.”

“I can’t believe I ate the whole thing.”

Each quarter, we go out into the city and forage for our stories, bringing them back to our kitchen and experimenting to see what they’ll taste like. We draw inspiration from recipes collected along the way, and from the people whose work in local food makes Milwaukee such an incredible place to live, work and eat.

There is an interconnectedness to it all—a rich flavor profile that gives our city its depth. They say that too many cooks in the kitchen spoils the broth, but in our case, I think it makes for some mighty tasty soup. You can read about some of those cooks—no, literally, chefs—in two of our stories. Explore the ranks of Milwaukee’s restaurant groups and learn the few degrees of separation between so Read More

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Letter From the Publisher – Summer 2015

By Jen Ede

It’s been a wild ride since our summer issue hit the streets in May of 2013. The previous October, returning back to my home town after a decade away, I quickly understood that everyone I talked to about our impending launch fell into two camps.

The first group immediately understood what an Edible title meant for the city—that there finally would be a magazine completely devoted to the local and sustainable food movement gaining such strong momentum. In talking with them, I realized that our arrival was actually three or four years too late. There was so much to talk about, history and relationships already at play. The food stories kept coming like a zucchini harvest—and we tried to bake them into everything. In our third year, I promise we’ll keep on dishing.

The second group wasn’t as much in the know as far as nationally-recognized food magazine titles go (my parents among them)—but they were equally intrigued and supportive. We’re a city that loves food, after all. In the past few years, Milwaukee has gained national notoriety as a culinary destination—we’re no longer just a stop enroute to Chicago. We might haute up our cuisine, … Read More

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Milwaukee From a Different Angle

Paddle Our Waterways for New Perspectives

Story and Photography by Jen Ede

At the last working boatyard in downtown Milwaukee, the Edible Milwaukee team lowers ourselves into brightly-colored kayaks, testing our balance and learning proper paddling techniques. We life jacket up, hang our cameras around our necks and hope to hell we don’t capsize. We are kindly offered dry bags in which to stash our valuables. If Fox 6 can do it with TV cameras, we tell ourselves, we can totally manage with a few DSLRs.

The season hasn’t quite started yet, but there’s a freshness and hope hanging in the air—like we’re about to discover something new in the middle of a city we think we’ve already seen in every possible way. Beth Handle, owner of Milwaukee Kayak Company, is our guide along downtown’s waterways, which we’ve previously only seen from vehicles not requiring extensive use of the arms. We push off, dipping our paddle on one side of the kayak then the other, and quickly find a rhythm to glide ourselves along. It’s already fun and we haven’t “seen” anything yet.

Handle clearly feels at home on the water. Her parents owned a cabin up North and … Read More

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Seder6

The Seder

Story by Jen Ede
Photography by Joe Laedtke

In the Jewish tradition, it is considered a mitzvah—a good deed—to invite people of other faiths to attend the Seder dinner. The Seder marks the beginning of Passover, an eight day celebration of the Israelites’ liberation from slavery in Egypt. The story of the exodus has been told and re-told over multiple generations (and diaspora) at this ritual feast, and is accompanied by symbolic foods, gestures, literature, and traditions. The messages, though told in one religious context, are broad enough that anyone, regardless of creed, can find meaning in them.

Micah Kaufman, currently the executive chef of the Milwaukee Art Museum, welcomed us last year into his family’s home, owned by aunt and uncle Ira and Nancy Kaufman in Mequon. The Kaufmans’ mitzvah was twofold—they educated both our minds and our palates. The daylong feast featured a diversity of recipes drawn from both branches of Judaism: Ashkenazi and Sephartic. (Ashkenazim descend from the Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, centered in Germany, and Sepharti from Portugal, Spain, North Africa, and the Middle East.) The culinary choices at the Kaufman’s home reflected the family’s travels, imbuing the meal with flavors as … Read More

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JenEde

Letter From the Publisher – Spring 2015

By Jen Ede

We made it. I say this first as a Wisconsinite, relieved at making it through a gray, seemingly-unending winter, grateful for spring. I say this secondly as a business owner, publishing a magazine that is just about to enter its third year.

Between our first and second years, we grew—in circulation, in page count, and in revenue—like we’d just been fed some miracle elixir. But really, there was no magic. There is no magic in this town, only hard work and mutual support. We had arrived to a community proud of its heritage and its artisanship. We found businesses, hopeful and invested in bettering our city in the long-term. The partners we approached at first didn’t know who we were, but when we explained what we wanted to do, they understood and backed us. Today, many of them are still with us, along with our advisors, contributors, friends, and supporters. Building a business up that can sustain itself long-term is a challenge, but beyond the products and services we offer, we live on through the legacy and culture we create. Success has many different definitions, but I often think of it in terms of the integrity with … Read More

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